Medical Alert System

Sign in to YouTube Sign in with your Google Account (YouTube, Google+, Gmail, Orkut, Picasa, or Chrome) to dislike RiverfrontMediaGroup’s video. Add to Sign in to YouTube Sign in with your Google Account (YouTube, Google+, Gmail, Orkut, Picasa, or Chrome) to add RiverfrontMediaGroup’s video to your playlist. http://info.acadianoncall.com/blog After dad passed away, mom was concerned about living alone for the first time in almost 50 years. She is very independent but she’s also very wise…she knows, and accepts, her limitations. So we began looking for a medical alert system from a company with a proven track record of fast, professional assistance in case mom had some kind of accident or medical emergency while alone at home. We found Acadian On Call and we were happy to discover they have some of the lowest priced monitoring plans in the industry without sacrificing the level of service. For peace of mind and emergency help with the push of a button, call Acadian at 866-945-3573 or visit them at acadianoncall.com.
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Medical Alert Systems Reviews Site Helps Users Find The Best System For Their Needs

It is one of the leading causes for seniors being hospitalized. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) has released statistics which show that 1 in 3 seniors above 65 experience falls each year. As a person ages, he or she can become more susceptible to falls and other medical emergencies. Getting help fast can mean the difference between a quicker and easier recovery down the road, or more troubling consequences. With a medical alert system installed at home, seniors can press an SOS button and become connected with emergency dispatch operators who can assist them. Having help available at the click of a button can have far-reaching results for the on-going good health of the elderly system users.
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Medical Alert Systems Reviews Site Helps Users Find The Best System For Their Needs

Please, pass it along. Tucson, AZ June 21, 2013- Better Business Bureau of Southern Arizona is warning consumers of automated calls promising them a free medical alert system. The system is supposed to help protect seniors in the event of break-ins or medical emergencies. BBB has received numerous phone calls from concerned Southern Arizona seniors in recent weeks who say they received an automated robo-call from a company identifying itself as Emergency Medical Alert Systems,Senior Safety Alert, Senior Emergency Care, Senior Safe Alert, or something similar. The call appears to target the elderly, disabled, and diabetic. The automated message says that someone has ordered a free medical alert system for you, and this call is to confirm shipping instructions. The message then instructs the listener to press a button to speak to a customer service representative for verification purposes, where the representative asks for the listeners credit card and personal information. These automated dialing systems can place tens of thousands of calls a day.
To see the original version , visit BBB warns Consumers of Medical Alert System Scam

BBB warns Consumers of Medical Alert System Scam

MedicalAlertSystemsHQ.com – Compare & Find The Best Systems ( EMAILWIRE.COM , September 23, 2013 ) Los Angeles, CA — The new medical alert systems reviews site at http://MedicalAlertSystemsHQ.com has been launched. Medical Alert Systems, or Personal Emergency Response Systems (PERS), allow seniors to connect with help right away in cases of medical emergencies. The site provides detailed reviews of the top medical alert systems for seniors, so that consumers can compare and find a system that suits them best. The site also includes guides and articles with tips on what to look for when selecting a good system. The possibility of falling down and getting hurt is a major concern for the elderly. It is one of the leading causes for seniors being hospitalized. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) has released statistics which show that 1 in 3 seniors above 65 experience falls each year. As a person ages, he or she can become more susceptible to falls and other medical emergencies.
View the original write-up including any supplementary images or video, please see http://emailwire.com/release/134962-Medical-Alert-Systems-Reviews-Site-Helps-Users-Find-The-Best-System-For-Their-Needs.html

Medical Alert Systems

Add to Sign in to YouTube Sign in with your Google Account (YouTube, Google+, Gmail, Orkut, Picasa, or Chrome) to add RiverfrontMediaGroup’s video to your playlist. http://info.acadianoncall.com/blog You have several choices when it comes to medical alert systems. The most important things you want to consider are, first, does the company have a good track record? Do they do their own monitoring? How durable is their equipment…is it going to work when it’s needed most? And, does the company have professionally trained emergency response professionals available 24-7? Another important consideration is price.
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Medical Alert Systems

Medical Alert Systems in the Age of Technology

medical alert1 Medical Alert Systems in the Age of Technology

Overall, these tags assist in searching for instant medical consideration to avoid severe problems or life-threatening conditions. Some corporations waive the installation medical alert buttons expenses. You can inquire concerning the month-to-month payment options. Medical alert methods are proving to be a boon in disguise for seniors dwelling alone. A senior medical alarm is about more than just convenience – it is about freedom, independence, and peace of thoughts. These devices make it easier in your loved ones and yourself to feel secure.
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medical alert

Here is a nightmare story that recently happened to a colleague living alone and recovering from hip-replacement surgery. She had a medical alert system that included a pendant to wear around her neck. For just one time, she thought she didn’t need to wear the necklace to go into her kitchen since it was close by. My colleague fell and was immobile on her kitchen floor for 10 hours. She was hospitalized, subsequently had a stroke — which may have had nothing to do with the fall — and died. Not a good story.
To read the original version , visit SUCCESSFUL AGING with Helen Dennis: What to look for in a medical alert system

Letter: Alert system invites recent evening drama

Such things as medical alert bracelets reveal information such as allergies, diseases and conditions that may affect, or in turn, be affected by the medical care administered. These health indicators work to ensure that everyone is safe. The patient receives the best critical care when medical professionals are easily and confidently able to work within the confines of the patients general health status, reducing the chance of any additional stress to the patients compromised system from a traumatic injury or sudden illness. Medical staff can competently come to the patients aid without the fear of some negative physical response to the treatment. Medical Alert Bracelets With the variety of medical information bracelets, as well as the proliferation of cell phones and smartphones , it may seem easy to dismiss the idea of medical ID bracelets, which may now seem antiquated in the swirling midst of abundant technology. But medical identification bracelets offer information in a way that can be easily detected by medical professionals for patients who cant inform health care professionals of their health histories. Smartphones and cell phones can be important for critical situations in terms of contacting medical professionals and ensuring that the patient will be attended to and treated by a medical emergency professional; but these phones cant give the critical care information that a medical identification bracelet or a fully integrated system provides.
To see the original sourceincluding any supplementary images or video, visit Medical Alert Systems in the Age of Technology

BBB warns Consumers of Medical Alert System Scam

Eight minutes later, it rang again and I did not have a chance to answer it because simultaneously there was a loud pounding at my front door. We heard the banging, stumbled to the front door where a man was shouting Police a (medical) alert call has gone unanswered. My partner stated his name and that there was no medical emergency. Knowing we didnt push the medical alert button, he was skeptical to open the door but the officers demanded so. Still half asleep, he opened the door, holding up his hand stating once again his name while informing the police that there was no medical emergency. In the time it took for me to get a robe on and go to the kitchen, my partner was on the floor, held down by an officers knee in his back, hands being held behind his back, and another officer was reaching for handcuffs. I started screaming for them to stop.
To read the source content including any images or video, see here Letter: Alert system invites recent evening drama

SUCCESSFUL AGING with Helen Dennis: What to look for in a medical alert system

The automated message says that someone has ordered a free medical alert system for you, and this call is to confirm shipping instructions. The message then instructs the listener to press a button to speak to a customer service representative for verification purposes, where the representative asks for the listeners credit card and personal information. These automated dialing systems can place tens of thousands of calls a day. BBB shares some tips on howconsumers can avoid being a victim: Hang up the phone! Do not press any buttons. Dont even speak! If you answer and a live person is on the line, ask for the companys physical address. A legitimate company will never refuse to give this information to its potential customers. If the representative refuses to give out a physical address for the company or other identifying information, it is most likely a scam.
To see the original version , visit http://azstarnet.com/news/blogs/centsible-mom/bbb-warns-consumers-of-medical-alert-system-scam/article_a48c8e20-da98-11e2-b7c6-001a4bcf887a.html

Medical-id Bracelets From A Company With Some Personal Experience

Medical bracelet speaks when you can’t

That bracelet for Hobyak’s mother led to orders from her friends – and a company was born. Soon after, an official from the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation who had a teenage daughter with Type 1 diabetes urged Fisher to make a medical-identification bracelet that teens wouldn’t mind wearing. Thus began the company’s focus on ID jewelry. A friend’s son designed a website, and the orders haven’t stopped since. Products evolved from pre-engraved to being engraved at Hope Paige’s headquarters. Most of that work now is done in Michigan because the volume of orders has become so large, Fisher said. Not one who sees logic in reinventing what is already out there, Fisher instead has pursued partnerships.
To see the original versionincluding any supplementary images or video, visit http://articles.philly.com/2012-04-08/business/31308552_1_medical-id-bracelets-medical-bracelets-facebook-page

Beaded Medical ID Bracelets from StickyJ

Or they may not have a smartphone at all, she added. If an Alzheimers patient gets lost and is found wandering in the street, a passerby can look at the bracelet and immediately identify the person and the problem, said Mandelzweig, who recommends that Alzheimers patients have silicon bracelets that could be worn all the time and not suffer water damage. An ID that is never taken off would help medical or police personnel identify a dementia patient. It would also benefit people who lost their ability to speak and organ transplant recipients. She told the story of a man whose heart is on his right side due to a defect rather than on the left. Can you imagine a medic using a stethoscope on his chest to listen to his heartbeat and doesnt find it? the company co-owner suggested.
To see the original version , visit http://www.jpost.com/Health-and-Science/Medical-bracelet-speaks-when-you-cant

Sign in Sign in to YouTube Sign in with your Google Account (YouTube, Google+, Gmail, Orkut, Picasa, or Chrome) to dislike Sticky Jewelry’s video. Add to Sign in to YouTube Sign in with your Google Account (YouTube, Google+, Gmail, Orkut, Picasa, or Chrome) to add Sticky Jewelry’s video to your playlist. Diabetes, Epilepsy, Asthma, Allergies, etc), an all-silver bead bracelet, and an alternating silver plated and gold plated bead bracelet. Bracelets and tags are interchangeable to provide a combination look that works well with every outfit. Fits wrist sizes 5 1/2″ to 6 1/2″. Category
For the original sourceincluding any supplementary images or video, visit Beaded Medical ID Bracelets from StickyJ

Medical ID bracelet uses texting to relay emergency info [Updated]

Textbracelet

But the Text ID jewelry is the first to employ short message service, or text, technology. The bracelets cost $15 to $50, depending upon the design, and are available at Wal-Mart, Walgreens, Ralphs, Albertsons and Kroger, among other retailers. [Updated Nov. 1, 2011, 4:25 pm.: The original version of this post said the jewelry was available at the listed retailers. Only the brochures are available at the retailers. The jewelry must be ordered through the brochure, online or by phone.] With the TextID bracelets, information can be accessed within seconds of an emergency responder sending a text to the five-digit number on the ID.
View the source version including any images or video, visit Medical ID bracelet uses texting to relay emergency info [Updated]

Simplyhome Personal Emergency Response System

Personal emergency response system kits recalled

Sign in to YouTube Sign in with your Google Account (YouTube, Google+, Gmail, Orkut, Picasa, or Chrome) to dislike SimplyHomeSystems’s video. Add to Sign in to YouTube Sign in with your Google Account (YouTube, Google+, Gmail, Orkut, Picasa, or Chrome) to add SimplyHomeSystems’s video to your playlist. Sign in Uploaded on Feb 25, 2011 We are an affiliation of care providers who have been providing supports for the disabled and elderly since 1990. While our goal of helping families and caregivers has remained the same from the beginning, we realized in 2003 that new technology would allow us to dramatically improve the quality of our service and reduce the cost to those in need. We developed the SimplyHome system with this in mind and have been expanding our offerings and services ever since. Today we work towards our mission of helping the aging and disabled populations nationwide from our offices in North Carolina and Wisconsin. We currently offer two levels of systems, our PERS Plus and our Butler system. The PERS Plus is our entry level system that uses a phone line to activate a notification to our EMT call center should you have a need.
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FTC – Personal Emergency Response Systems

Recall Summary Name of Product: Visonic Amber Classic and Amber SelectX Personal Emergency Response System (PERS) Kits Hazard: A single Amber Base station set to Common Area Mode will not detect a low battery or dead battery warning signal from the remote pendant that notifies the end user or system administrator to replace the pendant battery. Remedy: Repair Consumer Contact: Visonic at (800) 223-0020 from 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. ET Monday through Friday or online at http://www.visonic.com and click on North America and click on Product News under the Solutions & Products tab for more information about the recall. Photos are available at http://www.cpsc.gov/en/Recalls/2013/Visonic-Recalls-Amber-Personal-Emergency-Response-System-Kits Recall Details Units: About 24,000 Description: The recalled Visonic Amber Personal Emergency Response System (PERS) kit enables a user to push a button on a pendant to signal a request for assistance. An Amber kit consists of one wireless pendant worn by the user, one Amber brand base station, generally connected to a phone line, a power supply and backup battery.
For the original versionincluding any supplementary images or video, visit Visonic Recalls Amber Personal Emergency Response System Kits Due to Remote Pendant Battery Signal Failure

CES 2010: Wellcore System – The Mobile Personal Emergency Response System for Seniors Citizens

The emergency button is red on the Classic model and grey on the SelectX model. Recalled Classic models have catalog number 0-7425 and serial numbers 0408044281 through 4410052723. The first four digits of the serial number are manufacture dates from January 2008 through August 2010 in WWYY format. Recalled SelectX models have catalog number 0-100729 and serial numbers 2308600299 through 3013079617 The first four digits represent manufacture dates June 2008 through July 2013 in WWYY format. The first two digits are week of manufacturer and the second two numbers are the year of manufacture. For example serial number 2308 600299 indicates a manufacturing date of the 23rd week of 2008 or roughly June 2008.
For the original version , visit http://www.journalgazette.net/article/20130913/BLOGS23/130919787/-1/blogs

The first two digits are week of manufacturer and the second two numbers are the year of manufacture. For example serial number 2308 600299 indicates a manufacturing date of the 23rd week of 2008 or roughly June 2008. Each unit has an external label on the back of the base station, with the product name and serial number. Only Amber Classic or SelectX base stations that are placed in Common Area Mode by a professionally trained PERS system installer and are used without additional base stations, are included in the recall. The kits, manufactured in Israel, were sold at Visonic distributors and professional alarm installation firms nationwide from January 2008, through August 2013, for between $220 and $240 for the kits. Consumers should immediately contact their system installer or a Visonic alarm installation professional to determine if their Amber base station is set to Common Area Mode, and if so, to either reset their unit to another mode or make other system changes, such as adding an additional base station. Only a professionally-trained PERS system installer can identify and modify the particular mode configuration.
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Personal Emergency Response Systems

Before purchasing, renting, or leasing a system, check the unit for defects. Ask to see the warranty and service contract and get any questions resolved. Ask about the repair policy. Find out how to arrange for a replacement or repair if a malfunction occurs. If a PERS salesperson solicits you by phone, and you are interested in the device, ask for information about prices, system features, and services. You can then use the information to comparison shop among other PERS providers.
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Visonic recalls Amber Personal Emergency Response System kits

What kind of training does the center staff receive? What procedures does the center use to test systems in your home? How often are tests conducted? The FTC works for the consumer to prevent fraudulent, deceptive and unfair business practices in the marketplace and to provide information to help consumers spot, stop, and avoid them. To file a complaint or to get free information on consumer issues, visit http://www.ftc.gov or call toll-free, 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357); TTY: 1-866-653-4261. The FTC enters Internet, telemarketing, identity theft, and other fraud-related complaints into Consumer Sentinel, a secure online database available to hundreds of civil and criminal law enforcement agencies in the U.S.
View the original write-up including any images or video, see: FTC – Personal Emergency Response Systems

Visonic Recalls Amber Personal Emergency Response System Kits Due to Remote Pendant Battery Signal Failure

* Protects on the go-not just at home for a safe, active lifestyle. When paired with a Wellcore-compatible cell phone, Wellcore allows 24/7 protection anywhere within the cell phones coverage range. When a fall is detected, the cell phone summons emergency responders to the exact location of the fall using the cell phones GPS, and caregivers are alerted. * Innovative design. Made of brushed aluminum, the Wellcore device and base unit feature contemporary design from one of the worlds most renowned industrial designers, Dr. Hartmut Esslinger, founder frog design. Unlike other Personal Emergency Response devices, the Wellcore solution is stylish as well as waterproof. By Chip Chick Staff Transform Your Home into a Smart Home for Under $250 Bucks You might have heard the Internet of Things bandied about as a sort of new wave of connectivity.
To see the original source , visit http://www.chipchick.com/2010/01/wellcore-system-monitors-senior-citizen.html

Alerts Issued About Free Medical Alert Calls

‘Free’ Medical Alert Device Offers Harm, Not Help

“Looks like you are getting the system because either yourself, a friend, a family member or maybe even someone you know has experienced a fall in the past,” the caller says. Strauss told me he knows of no relative or friend who signed him up. And he doubts it’s free. “You know and I know that there’s a monitoring fee,” said Strauss, 74. When he interrupted one of the automated calls last week and spoke with a rep, Strauss said he was told he would get a “senior safety” system. The rep didn’t say there’d be a cost and didn’t ask for payment information but he did ask for Strauss’ address, which he refused to provide. The rep wouldn’t give Strauss a phone number where he could call back, which is another reason to be suspicious of the call. The calls he got came from the 724 area code in Pittsburgh and the 610 area code locally.
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Dreys Diabetic Medic Alert Dogs

Dreys diabetic medical alert dogs
photo by Alison Hart

When you call companies, ask for documentation about fees before providing payment accounts. Some hospitals and aging services agencies have subsidized programs. But if you don’t qualify, you may need to pay a one-time installation fee of around $100 plus $1 to $2 per day for device rental and monitoring. Other companies require you to purchase the device. You can foil scammers with these five tips: Speak Out! Has someone tried to contact you about free medical alert devices? Do you have tips other readers could use to avoid these types of scams? Speak out on our Scams & Fraud message board .
To view the source version including any supplementary images or video, visit ‘Free’ Medical Alert Device Offers Harm, Not Help

Sandy Strauss of North Whitehall sits by his answering machine in his living room. He has received several calls offering him a free medical alert system. The calls are circulating nationally and several Better Business Bureaus and the NY attorney general say they are scams.

The voice implies that somebody, her doctor or maybe her children, signed her up for a medical alert system. It’s all free, the recording implies. “And everything is ready to be sent to your home,” said Adams, who lives in Dearborn Heights, Mich. Adams said she even phoned her daughter to double check, if maybe she did sign up for some service. But no, the daughter didn’t pay for any medical alert system for her mother. “I couldn’t believe it. They called me again Saturday,” Adams said. The medical alert system scam is in full swing in Michigan, as well as other states including New York, Texas, Wisconsin and Kentucky.
For the source article including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/personalfinance/2013/06/09/scam-medical-alert/2397189/

BBB: Medical Alert Scam Targets Seniors

Along with Smith’s guidance, Pearson successfully trained and certified her first Medical Alert Dog. Today, Pearson runs D.A.D. behind her house in a huge, immaculately clean training facility. Along with D.A.D.’s head trainer, Cindy Terrell , and several other employees, Pearson uses positive reinforcement, clicker training, and “Go Tell” training philosophies over the course of eight months for each dog. Once the training is complete, each dog will be certified as a Medical Alert Dog and Service Dog in Public Access. This certification protects them under ADA, which makes it illegal not to allow them in to any public facility or business, per Texas State law. D.A.D. will be holding a “Public Access” day in late July for all of their new Medical Alert Dog families, in which they plan on taking the dogs and their new families in to public places and businesses.
To read the original version including any images or video, see: Dreys Diabetic Medic Alert Dogs

Seniors get a warning on medical alert scam

scam alert

Some of the automated calls ask consumers to punch 1 if they wish to order a device or want further information. In other cases, salespeople told consumers that they were eligible for a free system or that a system had been paid for on their behalf and the salesperson needed to confirm shipping instructions. The BBB believes that consumers who are receptive to the sales pitch will be asked for financial information to cover a monthly monitoring service fee of $34.95. In many cases, senior citizens never received the devices but were still charged the monthly service fee. Others were unable to obtain refunds or return the items. Better Business Bureaus across the nation have reported similar calls coming from companies using the names Medical Emergency, Medical Alert Company, First Alert Company, Life Alert USA, Lifewatch, Senior Safety Alert, Senior Emergency Care, Senior Safe Alert, Emergency Medical Alert Systems or Medical Alarms Hewitt. Life Alert, the California firm that advertises Ive fallen and I cant get up, has sued two businesses that used names similar to its brand in robo-call marketing schemes.
To read the source content including any media, go to BBB: Medical Alert Scam Targets Seniors