Visonic Recalls Amber Personal Emergency Response System Kits

Visonic Recalls Amber Personal Emergency Response System Kits Due to Remote Pendant Battery Signal Failure

The first four digits of the serial number are manufacture dates from January 2008 through August 2010 in WWYY format. Recalled SelectX models have catalog number 0-100729 and serial numbers 2308600299 through 3013079617 The first four digits represent manufacture dates June 2008 through July 2013 in WWYY format. The first two digits are week of manufacturer and the second two numbers are the year of manufacture. For example serial number 2308 600299 indicates a manufacturing date of the 23rd week of 2008 or roughly June 2008. Each unit has an external label on the back of the base station, with the product name and serial number. Only Amber Classic or SelectX base stations that are placed in Common Area Mode by a professionally trained PERS system installer and are used without additional base stations, are included in the recall. The kits, manufactured in Israel, were sold at Visonic distributors and professional alarm installation firms nationwide from January 2008, through August 2013, for between $220 and $240 for the kits. Consumers should immediately contact their system installer or a Visonic alarm installation professional to determine if their Amber base station is set to Common Area Mode, and if so, to either reset their unit to another mode or make other system changes, such as adding an additional base station.
To view the original article including any images or video, see: Visonic recalls Amber Personal Emergency Response System kits

Monthly fees may range from $15 to $50 and include the monitoring service. Look for a service that allows for a month-to-month contractin case youare dissatisfied with, or you no longer require, the service. Lease agreements can be long-term or lease-to-purchase. If you lease, review the contract carefully before signing. Make special note of cancellation clauses, which may require you to pay a cancellation fee or other charges. Before purchasing, renting, or leasing a system, check the unit for defects. Ask to see the warranty and service contract and get any questions resolved.
To read the original source , visit Personal Emergency Response Systems

Personal emergency response system kids recalled

Manufacturer: Visonic Ltd., of Tel Aviv, Israel Manufactured in: Israel The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) is still interested in receiving incident or injury reports that are either directly related to this product recall or involve a different hazard with the same product. Please tell us about your experience with the product on SaferProducts.gov. Media ContactPlease use the phone numbers below for all media requests.Phone: (301) 504-7908Spanish: (301) 504-7800 CPSC Consumer Information HotlineContact us at this toll-free number if you have questions about a recall:800-638-2772 (TTY 301-595-7054)Times: 8 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. ET; Messages can be left anytimeCall to get product safety and other agency information and to report unsafe products.
Read the original report including any media, please go here Visonic Recalls Amber Personal Emergency Response System Kits Due to Remote Pendant Battery Signal Failure

Personal Emergency Response Systems

The first four digits of the serial number are manufacture dates from January 2008 through August 2010 in WWYY format. Recalled SelectX models have catalog number 0-100729 and serial numbers 2308600299 through 3013079617 The first four digits represent manufacture dates June 2008 through July 2013 in WWYY format. The first two digits are week of manufacturer and the second two numbers are the year of manufacture. For example serial number 2308 600299 indicates a manufacturing date of the 23rd week of 2008 or roughly June 2008. Each unit has an external label on the back of the base station, with the product name and serial number. Only Amber Classic or SelectX base stations that are placed in Common Area Mode by a professionally trained PERS system installer and are used without additional base stations, are included in the recall. Incidents/Injuries: The firm received one report of a pendant that failed to operate due to a low battery undetected by the base station in Common Area Mode. No injuries have been reported. Sold at: Visonic distributors and professional alarm installation firms nationwide from January 2008 through August 2013 for between $220 and $240 for the kits.
For the original version , visit Personal emergency response system kids recalled

Personal emergency response systems

Sometimes, consumers who purchase systems can choose between provider-based and manufacturer-based centers, but consumers who rent systems from a PERS manufacturer usually must use its national center. Purchasing, Renting, or Leasing a PERS A PERS can be purchased, rented, or leased. Neither Medicare nor Medicaid, in most states, will pay for the purchase of equipment, nor will most insurance companies. The few insurance companies that do pay require a doctor’s recommendation. Some hospitals and social service agencies may subsidize fees for low-income users. Purchase prices for a PERS normally range from $200 to more than $1,500. However, some consumers have reported paying $4,000 to $5,000 for a PERS.
For the source content including any images or video, see here FTC – Personal Emergency Response Systems

FTC – Personal Emergency Response Systems

GSM and GPS services. Also the battery life has changed enormously with one company in the Algarve providing a PERS device that lasts seven to eight days without the need for a recharge. Other devices often require charging once a day. Unlike household alarms which can be relatively expensive, PERS are now available at less than 20 per month with no upfront costs. Applications The range of applications for PERS is considerable. For instance, your child who wants theindependenceto go to school by himself, your teenage daughter who goes out at weekends, sports and other active people, people living in isolated areas or those who see themselves as a target for mugging/robbery – there is a whole range of people who would find use in a personal emergency response system.
For the original version , visit http://www.algarveresident.com/0-53450/algarve/personal-emergency-response-systems

Senior Driving Safety Still Taboo Subject

Dan Ramon Joins Safety Consulting Engineers as Senior Explosive Test Specialist

Approximately 40 percent of 1,011 adults with an elderly parent questioned in the survey commissioned by the Web site Caring.com and released in conjunction with the NSC said they feel uncomfortable talking to their parents about their safety behind the wheel. “Adult children are just ill-equipped to deal with this conversation because it means coming to grips with their parents’ mortality,” said Andy Cohen, the CEO of Caring.com, which provides information about caring for aging parents. “Taking away driving abilities is a symbolic step towards end-of-life, and it also marks the beginning of the adult child stepping into a caretaker role,” he said. Yet more than a third of the people said there should be restrictions on their parents’ driving, including limits on night driving and long distances. But taking away seniors’ driving privileges has broader implications. “When you take a person’s car away, you’re doing more than just affecting their mobility, you’re affecting their independence,” said Dr.
To see the source report including any supplementary images or video, please visit http://www.reuters.com/article/2008/06/11/us-drivers-seniors-idUSN1033628720080611

Vehicles are seen during rush hour on the 405 freeway in Los Angeles, California October 3, 2007. The number of senior drivers is expected to soar by 70 percent in the next 20 years but many adults are reluctant to talk to their aging parents about their driving abilities. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

“It’s insurance in case something should happen,” is how Bob Harrison, 85, describes the unobtrusive monitors being tested in his apartment at the TigerPlace retirement community in Columbia, Mo. Living at home specialists call it aging in place is what most people want for their later years. Americans 40 and older are just as worried about losing their independence later in life as they are about losing their memory, according to a recent survey by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. Common-sense interventions like grab bars in bathrooms and taping down rugs to prevent tripping can make homes safer as seniors deal with chronic illnesses. Technology is the next frontier, and a far cry from those emergency-call buttons seniors sometimes wear to summon help. Already, some companies are offering monitoring packages that place motion sensors on the front door, a favorite chair, even the refrigerator, and then send an alert to a family member if there’s too little activity over a certain period of time.
Read the original report including any supplementary images or video, see here http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/07/10/gadgets-seniors-safety/2505577/

Senior safety is the leader of the swat team

He has held a variety of additional senior engineering positions as well. Safety Consulting Engineers helps its clients to achieve enabling and sustainable Process Safety Management programs, Process Safety Proficiency (competency, know-how, and experience), and a Culture that encourages safety excellence. SCE has multiple test cells for a wide range of services that include consulting, hazard analysis, testing coupled with safety training in energetic materials, explosives and hazardous chemicals; DOT and UN classification of explosives; explosion and propulsion analysis and testing; materials characterization testing; electrostatics analysis and testing; process safety engineering and process safety management services in the commercial and government markets. For more information visit http://www.sceinc.com . DEKRA SE is one of the worlds leading expert organizations. The company currently operates in more than 50 countries.
To see the original sourceincluding any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20131119005371/en/Dan-Ramon-Joins-Safety-Consulting-Engineers-Senior

Senior Safety Tips: Avoid The Dangers of Fires, Falls and Medication Errors

Hourglass of Life

Just grateful and ready to do it big my last year, and be successful.” He has help. Sophomore corner Ne’Quan Phillips has starting experience, as does sophomore free safety Marrell Jackson. Fourth-year junior Dee Maggitt came into the program at the same time as Hardy-Tuliau, and is light on game experience, but won out the spot vacated by Edwards. Senior safety Charles Clay will rotate in where necessary. Maggitt knows Hardy-Tuliau perhaps the best of any Rainbow Warrior, and has a read on what makes him tick the desire to be great. Like the San Antonio Spurs’ Tim Duncan, Hardy-Tuliau has a stoic exterior and a lighter side that is rarely seen by strangers. “He’s definitely a goofy guy off the field,” Maggitt said. “He likes to play around just as much as anybody, but he definitely does not bring that onto the field at all, which is good.
For the original version , visit Senior safety is the leader of the swat team

High-tech gadgets monitor seniors’ safety at home

Monitoring gadgets

According to the Centers for Disease Control, falls are the leading cause of injury death for senior adults. An active lifestyle can reduce the likelihood of falls, but doesnt completely eliminate the danger. Here are other ways to help seniors avoid falls: Get regular eye exams: Bifocal lens can distort depth perception, particularly when the wearer is going down stairs or downhill. Seniors should have their eyes checked at least once a year and consider getting single vision lens for wear during outside activities. Maintain steps & install ramps and railings: Home hazards include stairs, poor lighting, slippery surfaces, and uneven floors. Check for all these problems inside the home and at entrances. Review prescription medications: Some medications affect balance and alertness. Ask doctors and pharmacists about drug side effects and interactions.
View the source content including any media, please visit Senior Safety Tips: Avoid The Dangers of Fires, Falls and Medication Errors

Seniors Get A Warning On Medical Alert Scam

BBB: Medical Alert Scam Targets Seniors

“The call appears to target the elderly, disabled and diabetic,” the Better Business Bureau warned in a statement. “The automated message says ‘that someone has ordered a free medical alert system for you, and this call is to confirm shipping instructions.” Adams says she remembers the automated call saying something like “Press 5 for yes.” Adams has gotten three or four of these calls about this “free system.” She keeps hanging up. One Plymouth retiree said his wife got the first call in March after going to an emergency room with a dislocated shoulder. When she got the first computerized call, she pressed one of the numbers to talk to a live person who then firmly insisted she had to accept shipment of the medical alert device because it was ordered for her. When she asked who ordered it, the person said he was not at the liberty to say who ordered it. The retiree promptly hung up when the man then asked for her address.
For the original write-up including any supplementary images or video, go to http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/personalfinance/2013/06/09/scam-medical-alert/2397189/

Valley senior alertly shuns medical-alert system hustle

And an 85-year-old woman from Palm Bay who was reported missing late last year has not been found. Callarik, the missing Hillsborough County woman, was found safe but confused after she pulled over in Miami and another driver stopped to help, said Hillsborough sheriff’s officials. She was returned home after police found her name on a state missing person’s list. Mary Zelter, 86, wandered away from her Largo assisted living facility in February 2008. Her body eventually was found near Clearwater Beach, where she had driven her car into the water and drowned . The case prompted a pilot Silver Alert program in Pinellas County, which led to the creation of the statewide program in October.
Read the original version including any media, go to http://www.tampabay.com/news/aging/floridas-silver-alert-system-to-find-lost-seniors-has-fans-but-its-worth/1029819

scam alert

Mark asked who had placed the order and the person on the other end of the line said They werent permitted to share that information. Mark hung up and called his children. None of them had paid for me to get a medical-alert system, he said. Since then, he has gotten the same computerized phone call several more times and hangs up immediately. But hes getting increasingly annoyed. Where did they get my number from? he asked. When are they going to stop calling? They may not stop anytime soon.
To read the original source , visit http://dailyitem.com/0100_news/x1253329755/Valley-senior-alertly-shuns-medical-alert-system-hustle

Florida’s Silver Alert System to find lost seniors has fans, but its worth is unclear

Corey, BBB president and CEO. In many cases, these robo-calls are fraudulent attempts to obtain financial information that can be used to commit identity theft or that result in recurring charges to a victims credit card or bank account. In recent months, consumers have told the BBB that they have received calls often repeatedly from telemarketers offering a senior medical alarm or similar personal security device. The BBB has been unable to determine the source of the calls, which consumers said came from untraceable numbers in the 314, 636 and 573 area codes. Some of the automated calls ask consumers to punch 1 if they wish to order a device or want further information. In other cases, salespeople told consumers that they were eligible for a free system or that a system had been paid for on their behalf and the salesperson needed to confirm shipping instructions. The BBB believes that consumers who are receptive to the sales pitch will be asked for financial information to cover a monthly monitoring service fee of $34.95.
To read the source report including any media, please see BBB: Medical Alert Scam Targets Seniors

Seniors Get A Warning On Medical Alert Scam

medical alert systems

medical alert

But no, the daughter didn’t pay for any medical alert system for her mother. “I couldn’t believe it. They called me again Saturday,” Adams said. The medical alert system scam is in full swing in Michigan, as well as other states including New York, Texas, Wisconsin and Kentucky. The Michigan Attorney General’s Office has received about 50 complaints about this scam in the past two weeks, according to Joy Yearout, director of communications for Attorney General Bill Schuette. The scumbaggery against seniors has reached a super-low point with this con job. Who doesn’t know a senior who fears a break-in?
To see the original versionincluding any supplementary images or video, visit Seniors get a warning on medical alert scam

Medical alert devices to help seniors

Here’s how to report it Officials warn that scammers are behind many of these robocalls , sometimes stealing the names of reputable manufacturers or inventing corporate names that often include the word “senior.” Some of the callers falsely claim that your doctor ordered the device for you. Others such as Instant Response Systems of New York, which was recently shut down following a Federal Trade Commission investigation allegedly up the ante with legal threats. “They called seniors claiming they had already ordered a medical alert device and threatening them with a lawsuit if they didn’t pay,” says FTC attorney Arturo DeCastro. Jason (aka Yaakov) Abraham, who runs Instant Response Systems, did not respond to telephoned requests for comment. If you or a loved one needs a medical alert device, get recommendations from your health care provider or a social service agency. When you call companies, ask for documentation about fees before providing payment accounts. Some hospitals and aging services agencies have subsidized programs. But if you don’t qualify, you may need to pay a one-time installation fee of around $100 plus $1 to $2 per day for device rental and monitoring.
To read the original source , visit http://www.aarp.org/money/scams-fraud/info-07-2013/free-medical-alert-device-offers-hurt-more-than-help.html

Medical alert devices for seniors

medical alert device

The message may ask the consumer to press one to schedule the delivery or press another button to decline. Consumers who respond to the calls may be connected to a live representative who likely will ask for a bank account number, credit card number, or other personal information. Later, consumers may receive charges for the free system. Another unsolicited call going around is a Medicare card scam in which callers claim to represent Medicare and say the consumer needs a new Medicare card. The caller asks for the consumers bank account information or Social Security number to process and fulfill the new card. In reality, the caller does not represent Medicare.
To see the source version including any media, see here http://www.delphosherald.com/index.php?option=com_content&id=13130:medic-alert-device-scam-becoming-more-prevalent

scam alert

Monitored alerts The most popular medical alert systems available today are the ones that will connect your mom to a 24-hour emergency monitoring service when she needs help. These units come with waterproof “SOS” buttons — typically in the form of a necklace pendent or bracelet — and a base station that connects to her home phone line. At the press of a button, your mom could call and talk to a trained operator through the system’s base station receiver that works like a powerful speaker phone. The operator will find out what’s wrong, and will notify family members, a neighbor, friend or emergency services as needed. If you’re interested in this type of alert, there are literally dozens of services to choose from. One of the most widely used is the Philips Lifeline Medical Alert Service (lifelinesys.com, 800-380-3111) which costs $35 per month, plus an $82 start-up fee. Phillips also offers a new Auto Alert option (for $48 per month) that has fall detection sensors in the SOS button that can automatically summon help without your mom ever having to press a button. Some other major players in the industry that are a little less expensive (under $30 per month) include: LifeFone (lifefone.com, 877-849-8942), LifeStation (lifestation.com, 877-478-3390), Bay Alarm Medical (bayalarmmedical.com, 877-722-9633), Alert1 (alert-1.com, 888-919-3692), LifeGuardian (lifeguardianmedicalalarms.com, 800-378-2957) and MedicalAlert (medicalalert.com, 800-800-2537).
To see the original write-up including any supplementary images or video, go to Medical alert devices to help seniors

‘Free’ Medical Alert Device Offers Harm, Not Help

A medical alert system isn’t a replacement or a competitor to 911. Medicare doesn’t cowl medical alert methods, neither will most insurance coverage carriers, even with a physician’s written prescription. These programs are normally accessed by way medical alert bracelet of the native County Aging Services. Medical alert gadgets to the rescue” is one in every of many articles recommending a medical alarm for consumers. Now, they will have to wear a medical pendant transmitter in the bathe or tub. What else would possibly they be shedding? Not a factor.
Read the original article including any supplementary images or video, please see medical alert systems

Medic alert device scam becoming more prevalent

These devices are designed to provide a quick and easy way to communicate to the outside world, family members, or emergency medical professionals in the case of a threatening medical emergency, such as a fall, heart attack, or home invasion. In these times of need it is important that the wearer of the medical alert device get immediate response, and these medical devices can provide that care with a simple touch of a button. That kind of security is not only provides mental security but can prolong a seniors independence allowing the senior to remain in the family home. Most of these medical alert devices are really simplistic, and are devices composed of two major components, a home console and a pendant or small device which can be carried on the wrist or waist with an emergency button. If the wearer falls, become injured, or suffers any type of medical emergency they can press the button on their pendant. The button will send an alert to the home console which then sends a call to a customer services representative who will contact a family member or medical responder. The user can create a list of emergence contacts and set an order of importance to be contacted in the case a situation where to occur. medical alert device Range is one of the most important attributes for any user of a medical alert device to look for when shopping for a medical alert device. The range is the distance the wearer can travel away from the home console, and still have the device communication. Many of the best medical alert devices will have ranges up to 1000 feet. At this distance the wearer can safely travel about the distance of one typical city block. So the wearer can visit local friends and neighbors and still be in contact with their safety contacts and home console. Other devices have more limited ranges but most will have at least a150 foot range. The range of the device should match the mobility and life style of the intended wearer. If the wearer is still very mobile and enjoys walks and visits with neighbors they may need a longer range, for those who never leave the home or are bed ridden may not need an extended range. All home medical devices should come with an included base station. Make sure your medical alert device has this included in the package and the home console is not an additional purchase. The pendant is what the user will wear and take with them. All medical alert devices will include this device, though how that device is attached to the wearer may vary. Find out what is the most comfortable and easy way for the wearer to carry the pendant device. Some options of attachment are wristband, waistband, or necklace. Most pendants are waterproof or at least water resistant, but make sure. Time in the bathroom, shower or any exposure to wet surfaces can be very dangerous, you want to ensure that the device can be worn and will be safe if exposed to wet conditions. Make sure that the device has a battery backup included. You never want a situation where you may have loss of power to any part of the home alert device. Some units will include a wall mounted button. This option is not standard, so if that is an important aspect is to be sure to check if that is included. Most home medical alert systems have two way communications, that is the both wearer and the medical response professionals can speak to each other in the case of an emergency. Be sure this option is included it can be very important for the response team to be able to speak to the wearer to ascertain the problem and be sure to send the proper responders in the right amount of time. Some units will have included a check-in service; with this service the responders will regularly check-in with the wearer to ensure that they are o.k. This can be important for patients who may be immobile, or are experiencing mental problems. Some home medical alerts devices will include lock boxes, these are secured external boxes in which keys, identification, or other important items can be stored and accessed by the responders. Some units may also include voice extenders and microphones to ensure clear communication.
For the original versionincluding any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.doctortipster.com/18253-medical-alert-devices-for-seniors-2.html

Medic Alert Button Scares Off Robber

N.S. medical alert salesman charged by RCMP

The woman was not hurt. News Right NowNews More>> Updated: Tuesday, November 12 2013 1:44 AM EST2013-11-12 06:44:21 GMT AVILA BEACH, Calif. – Chevron Corporation is planning to turn the site of a massive oil spill in Avila Beach into a luxury resort.Chevron Corp. representatives tell Central Coast News they want to revitalize More >> AVILA BEACH, Calif. – Chevron Corporation is planning to turn the site of a massive oil spill in Avila Beach into a luxury resort. More >> Updated: Tuesday, November 12 2013 12:40 AM EST2013-11-12 05:40:22 GMT ORCUTT, Calif.-While the NFL continues to investigate the alleged bullying against Miami Dolphins’ Richie Incognito, one local high school football team is reacting to the scandal as they get ready for the playoffs.
To see the original versionincluding any supplementary images or video, visit Medic Alert Button Scares Off Robber

Seniors get a warning on medical alert scam

scam alert

Authorities said in some cases, after consumers press a button to accept the offer, they quickly receive another call asking for personal information, including credit card numbers. “The call appears to target the elderly, disabled and diabetic,” the Better Business Bureau warned in a statement. “The automated message says ‘that someone has ordered a free medical alert system for you, and this call is to confirm shipping instructions.” Adams says she remembers the automated call saying something like “Press 5 for yes.” Adams has gotten three or four of these calls about this “free system.” She keeps hanging up. One Plymouth retiree said his wife got the first call in March after going to an emergency room with a dislocated shoulder. When she got the first computerized call, she pressed one of the numbers to talk to a live person who then firmly insisted she had to accept shipment of the medical alert device because it was ordered for her. When she asked who ordered it, the person said he was not at the liberty to say who ordered it.
To see the original versionincluding any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/personalfinance/2013/06/09/scam-medical-alert/2397189/

When the woman asked the man who he was, he gave her a full name and said, “I’m here to make sure that you are OK,” according to the report. The woman activated the medical alert device she wore around her neck. When a voice responded over the intercom system to her call, the suspect snatched at the necklace “in an attempt to get the alert button away” from the woman, the report states. That act caused a burn on the victim’s neck and a cut on her right middle finger. The suspect then darted from the home without taking a thing. Officers found a smashed door frame and door glass when they arrived at the home, the report shows.
For the original version , visit http://www.knoxnews.com/news/2009/dec/15/home-invasion-reported-north-knox-county/

Medical alert button spooks home invader

An 82-year-old Annapolis Valley woman said she had written a $2,067 cheque for a medical alert system after a fast talker salesman came to her door. Clients of the system are supposed to be able to push a button if theres an emergency, and a dispatch centre responds. The woman said she signed a contract, but never received a copy. Nor did she get a box, instructions, or any explanation of what she should do if there is an emergency. RCMP have now charged Thomas Peter Fennessey. He will appear in Kentville provincial court on Nov.
For the original version , visit N.S. medical alert salesman charged by RCMP

Wichita man hits panic button on medical alert device to scare off pair demanding pain pills

KFDI-FM reports ( http://bit.ly/18PZBoP ) the incident happened around 8 p.m. Wednesday. The 57-year-old man told police he recognized a 30-year-old woman who came to his door, but not the man who was with her. The man says he pushed the woman away when she tried to hug him. At that point, he says, the male intruder knocked him down, used a stun gun on him and tried to force him to sell some of his prescription painkillers. Police say the couple fled when the victim pressed a panic button that goes to a medical alert business, which then called 911. Information from: KFDI-FM, http://news.kfdi.com
Read the original content including any images or video, see here Wichita man hits panic button on medical alert device to scare off pair demanding pain pills

Bbb Warns Consumers Of Medical Alert System Scam

Medical Alert Systems Reviews Site Helps Users Find The Best System For Their Needs

BBB shares some tips on howconsumers can avoid being a victim: Hang up the phone! Do not press any buttons. Dont even speak! If you answer and a live person is on the line, ask for the companys physical address. A legitimate company will never refuse to give this information to its potential customers. If the representative refuses to give out a physical address for the company or other identifying information, it is most likely a scam.
To read the original versionincluding any supplementary images or video, visit http://azstarnet.com/news/blogs/centsible-mom/bbb-warns-consumers-of-medical-alert-system-scam/article_a48c8e20-da98-11e2-b7c6-001a4bcf887a.html

Sign in to YouTube Sign in with your Google Account (YouTube, Google+, Gmail, Orkut, Picasa, or Chrome) to dislike AskGilda.com’s video. Add to Sign in to YouTube Sign in with your Google Account (YouTube, Google+, Gmail, Orkut, Picasa, or Chrome) to add AskGilda.com’s video to your playlist. Just call 1-800-752-5522 (toll-free) and get a FREE LOCKBOX with your own Medical Alert System for as low as $26.95 per month with no long term contract. Plus our 24-hour phone assistance is available for you day in and day out. You might wonder why and ask around “What is the best medical alert system?” Well, look no further, Vital Link Medical Life Alert Systems is here and they have been around since the early 80’s and is one of the best thriving medical alert systems providers for seniors. Vital Link has an A PLUS (A+) rating by the Better Business Bureau (BBB) and has been accredited since 1981. Remember, it’s just a phone call away. Just call 1-800-752-5522 (toll-free) and get your FREE LOCKBOX now.
To view the original content including any supplementary images or video, please see Medical Alert Systems Reviews | What is the Best Medical Alert System?

HOME MEDICAL ALERT SYSTEM

The attendant on duty then uses that number to dig out the patient’s card, which identifies him and his address. The attendant calls the patient to verify that there is an emergency. If no one answers, an ambulance or nearby friend is sent. Each patient is asked for three ”responders” – friends or relatives or the local police – who can get into his home. The system also has a timer that can be set for 12 or 24 hours. It automatically summons aid if it is not reset. Resetting occurs whenever the telephone is used or a reset button is pushed. This is a precaution against a patient’s passing out or falling and being unable to push the help button.
To read the original content including any supplementary images or video, please see HOME MEDICAL ALERT SYSTEM

Medical Alert Systems Reviews | What is the Best Medical Alert System?

Nov 2 2013 Abraaj pulls out from Tunisian pharma company , MENAFN (MENAFN) Dubai’s Abraaj Group said that it is pulling out from Tunisian pharmaceutical company Opalia Pharma, Arabian Business reported. The firm said that it has sold its shares to an … Nov 2 2013 Nakheel Union Coop to anchor new project , MENAFN (MENAFN) Dubai-based Nakheel signed the Union Coop supermarket as the anchor tenant at a new, 79,000 square feet community centre at International City. Arabian Business reported. Nakheel said in … Nov 2 2013 Dubai on list of best real estate markets , MENAFN (MENAFN) Dubai has made it on a global property investment “hot list” as prices continue to surge in the emirate, Arabian business reported. In the third quarter, for the first time the emirate … Nov 2 2013 Kuwait makes fruitful promotion of products in Iraq , Kuwait News Agency (KUNA) (MENAFN – Kuwait News Agency (KUNA)) Kuwait took part in Project Iraq 2013, the 6th International Trade Exhibition for Construction and Environmental Technology, Materials and Equipment, that was …
To see the source report including any supplementary images or video, please visit Medical Alert Systems Reviews Site Helps Users Find The Best System For Their Needs

Medical Alert Systems

Sign in to YouTube Sign in with your Google Account (YouTube, Google+, Gmail, Orkut, Picasa, or Chrome) to dislike RiverfrontMediaGroup’s video. Add to Sign in to YouTube Sign in with your Google Account (YouTube, Google+, Gmail, Orkut, Picasa, or Chrome) to add RiverfrontMediaGroup’s video to your playlist. http://info.acadianoncall.com/blog You have several choices when it comes to medical alert systems. The most important things you want to consider are, first, does the company have a good track record? Do they do their own monitoring? How durable is their equipment…is it going to work when it’s needed most? And, does the company have professionally trained emergency response professionals available 24-7? Another important consideration is price.
For the original version , visit http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AEn99-VpqbU